Living wonder

Image courtesy of Tourism and Events Queensland.

Image courtesy of Tourism and Events Queensland.

The Great Barrier Reef—the world’s largest and most complex reef system—is one of Australia’s most treasured natural wonders and an international icon.

This living reef is precious to all Queenslanders and the world.

Its marine ecosystem is complex—home to 600 types of soft and hard corals, more than 100 species of jellyfish, 3000 varieties of molluscs, 500 species of worms, 1625 types of fish, 133 varieties of sharks and rays, and more than 30 species of whales and dolphins.

Image courtesy of Tourism and Events Queensland.

Image courtesy of Tourism and Events Queensland.

It is as large as Great Britain or Japan, covering an area of around 70 million football fields, and traverses more than 2300 kilometres of Queensland’s spectacular coastline.

But the reef is also facing significant challenges, including coral cover decline from storms and cyclones, crown-of-thorns starfish breakouts and bleaching from ocean warming.

Addressing the ongoing impacts to the reef from climate change, ocean acidification, coastal development and water quality is a responsibility the Queensland Government takes very seriously.

Resources

Great Barrier Reef Outlook Report
Reef Water Quality Protection Plan Report Cards

The Queensland Government is implementing the Reef Water Quality Protection Plan in partnership with the Australian Government and stakeholders. Reef Plan is designed to ensure runoff from agriculture has no detrimental impact on the health and resilience of the Great Barrier Reef. An annual report card measures progress towards Reef Plan's goal and targets.

Last updated
24 March 2015